How To Make Red Clover Salve

Red clover may most often be taken in liquid form as a detox tea or lemonade in our modern era, but it has also been used as a primary base ingredient in salves for centuries.

Salve made from red clover is commonly used to treat dry or chapped skin, acne, eczema, psoriasis, minor wounds and burns. The recipe being shared here is for a traditional salve, but if you increase the coconut oil by one-third, the same recipe can be used to make an all-natural chapstick.

Red clover salve

Red Clover Salve And Chapstick Storage

I often luck into 10 for $1 deals on clear plastic rectangular or round containers with a firm-fitting lid at our local dollar tree. But, if I am making the DIY all natural salve as a gift or cannot find the super cheap containers, I just hop on Amazon and order some glass or tin ones. Containers for chapstick can be purchased nominally online if you desire a traditional delivering method.

red clover flower heads

Red Clover Salve Recipe Instructions

Prep Time5 mins
Total Time25 mins
Servings: 10 ounces of salve

Equipment

  • Measuring Cups
  • Measuring Spoons
  • Mason jars with firm-fitting lids or individual storage containers with equally firm-fitting lids. If using Mason jars, you will also need lids and rings.
  • Double boiler or small cook pot and a coffee cup or Mason jar.
  • Fine mesh strainer, cheesecloth, or several coffee filters.

Ingredients

  • 4 parts Herbs or Medicinal Flowers if using dried use 2 parts of herbs
  • 4 parts carrier oil
  • 1 part beeswax
  • Coconut oil Or your favorite carrier oil. Olive oil and almond oil work well also.
  • 1 tablespoon beeswax Pastilles recommended because they melt quicker.
  • water enough to use for the double boiler process

Instructions

  • Place the small cook pot on the stove, and fill it with about 4 inches of water.
  • Place the coffee cup or Mason jar inside the cook pot.
  • Put the herbs into the coffee cup or Mason jar.
  • Cover the herbs or medicinal flowers with the carrier oil.
  • Simmer the mixture over medium heat for approximately half an hour.
    Red clover pot
  • Strain the red clover salve mixture to remove all of the natural matter – preserving the liquid.
  • Pour the red clover salve liquid back into the jar or coffee cup in the double boiler.
  • Add in the beeswax and continue simmering over a medium heat until the wax has completely melted. Stir frequently to avoid clumping or scorching of the wax.
  • Once mixture begins to thicken after all of the beeswax has melted, pour the red clover mixture into storage containers and place the lid on firmly.

The Process on Video

So we split the whole A to Z making of the salve into three videos, because they’re almost half an hour long in total.

The first video walks you through the first five steps, right up to the step where you’re suppose to let it simmer for half an hour:

The second video walks you through steps 6 through 8, right up to the second simmer:

Last but not least, the 3rd video shows how to pour the salve into the storage containers:

Tips And Hints

Even though you are using coconut oil, the red clover salve will not melt as soon as it is applied to the skin. The amount of beeswax used in the all natural salve recipe will help the mixture retain its solid state.

How to Use the Red Clover Salve

Apply the salve liberally to dry or chapped skin, problem skin area, or onto the lips if the recipe was adapted into a chapstick.

You can also slightly warm red clover salve to mix into a poultice for easy spreading and wound coverage.

Red Clover Warnings

The red clover salve is generally considered safe to use even on young children, or any adult, but only if they don’t fall within any of the warning categories noted below. Even though red clover is being used only topically, it is not considered safe for individuals with certain health issues.

  • Do not use red clover if pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or nursing due to its estrogen-like effect on the body. This wild plant could also cause stimulation in the uterus that could prompt a miscarriage, impact growth, or cause birth defects.
  • Using red clover while also taking birth control pills and medications that are broken down through the liver could vastly decrease the potency of those medications.
  • Do not use red clover if you are allergic to aspirin.
  • Individuals on blood thinning medication, are having surgery within a two week time frame, or have any type of blood clotting disorder, should not use red clover.
  • Individuals with thyroid issues should not use red clover because it could interfere with prescription medication.
  • Anyone who has been refused estrogen supplements from a doctor or is engaging in hormone replacement therapy, should not use red clover without first clearing it with a medical professional.
  • No cancer patient undergoing chemotherapy should use red clover without first clearing it with their doctor.
  • Women who have or have had breast cancer, any type of gential cancer, or endometriosis should not use red clover without first garnering approval from their doctor. As an added precaution, if there is a history of such medical problems in your family, a doctor’s permission should also be secured before using red clover.

Red Clover Side Effects

If, after using red clover either topically or internally in tea or lemonade form, you experience any of the following symptoms, discontinue use and contact your doctor. Although such allergic reactions to red clover are not commonplace, they do happen.

  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Skin Rash
  • Diarrhea
Red clover salve finished product

Disclaimer

I am not a medical professional of any type. The information shared here is for research and educational purposes only. Always talk with a medical professional before starting a natural remedy routine.

Red clover is not an approved medicine by the United States Food and Drug Administration – FDA. Never forage red clover from any area where chemical pesticides or herbicides may have been sprayed.

About Tara Dodrill

Tara Dodrill
Tara Dodrill is a homesteading and survival journalist and author. She lives on a small ranch with her family in Appalachia. She has been both a host and frequent guest on preparedness radio shows. In addition to the publication of her first book, 'Power Grid Down: How to Prepare, Survive, and Thrive after the Lights go Out', Dodrill also travels to offer prepping tips and hands-on training and survival camps and expos.

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